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The New Yorker: The Invention of the Beach Read

"Around the turn of the nineteenth century, urbanization and industrialization gave summertime a new radiance—it offered a chance to escape the sweaty, overcrowded city and reconnect with nature. The steamship and the railroad made vacation getaways more accessible. Periodicals and newspapers began running features on resort towns and advertised summer activities and goods: cruises, camping … Continue reading The New Yorker: The Invention of the Beach Read

University Affairs: Why campus novels matter

"Sarah Henstra’s The Red Word won the 2018 Governor-General’s Literary Award for Fiction in English. In its citation, the prize jury declared it “groundbreaking and provocative,” and commended the novel as “an astonishing evisceration of the clichés of sexual politics as they exist not only on our college campuses, but also within broader present-day society.” … Continue reading University Affairs: Why campus novels matter

JSTOR Daily: The Origins of Women’s Soccer

"With women’s soccer abuzz in the news, it’s high time we take a look back to the first organized women’s soccer league, also known as “association football.” The British Ladies’ Football Club (BLFC) held their first match at Alexandra Park in Crouch End, London, in 1895. Ten thousand “jammed the pitch” to see the Blues … Continue reading JSTOR Daily: The Origins of Women’s Soccer

Very Hungry Caterpillar still being devoured 50 years on

Original Post by BBC News "In the light of the moon a little egg lay on a leaf." It's probably one of the most memorable opening lines in children's literature, and this month The Very Hungry Caterpillar is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The best-selling book which tells the story of a ravenous caterpillar eating its … Continue reading Very Hungry Caterpillar still being devoured 50 years on

How to Be a Better Web Searcher: Secrets from Google Scientists

"In many ways, search engines make our metacognitive skills come to the foreground. It is easy to do a search that plays into your confirmation bias—your tendency to think new information supports views you already hold. So good searchers actively seek out information that may conflict with their preconceived notions. They look for secondary sources … Continue reading How to Be a Better Web Searcher: Secrets from Google Scientists

‘The Public’ Movie Review: Life, Liberty and the Library as a Battlefield

"The film’s underlying theme [is] about how libraries are now one of the last outposts of American democracy. Within their walls, we see manifested issues not just of homelessness, but of race, class, addiction, mental illness and income inequality. Estevez, shooting on location at the Cincinnati Public Library, proves expert at detailing the workings of … Continue reading ‘The Public’ Movie Review: Life, Liberty and the Library as a Battlefield

Scientific Publishing Needs to Change

"Our scientific publication system suits a [past] world where scientists rarely met one another and learned of new scientific advances or theories through few rigorously-reviewed scientific journals. Experiments were carefully documented so that they could be repeated and validated for consensus building. The goal of scientific publication was to tear down silos. However, this is … Continue reading Scientific Publishing Needs to Change

Incendio! Polish Priests Burn Harry Potter Books.

Original Post by: BBC World News Europe Catholic priests in northern Poland have burned books they consider to be sacrilegious, including ones from the Harry Potter boy wizard series. An evangelical group, the SMS from Heaven Foundation, published pictures of the burning - which took place in the city of Gdansk - on Facebook. They … Continue reading Incendio! Polish Priests Burn Harry Potter Books.

Why does it cost millions to access publicly funded research papers? Blame the paywall

Canadian universities struggle to pay for access to their own research reports as publishers profit Kelly Crowe · CBC News · Posted: Mar 09, 2019 9:00 AM ET | Last Updated: March 9   Canada's academic librarians are cheering from the sidelines now that the University of California has cancelled its subscriptions with the academic … Continue reading Why does it cost millions to access publicly funded research papers? Blame the paywall

Celebrate the 35th Anniversary of Freedom to Read Week February 24 – March 2, 2019

"Freedom to Read Week is an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed them under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. . . . Freedom to read can never be taken for granted. Even in Canada, a free country by world standards, books and … Continue reading Celebrate the 35th Anniversary of Freedom to Read Week February 24 – March 2, 2019